Institutional responsibility at FIFA? Ha!

How many players have to cheat for the team to gain an unfair advantage?

FIFA is treating the issue of drugs in football in the same seriousness and urgency it is treating match fixing.

In other words: it’s doing nothing it all. This is not surprising. The corrupt cannot clean as the decaying cannot reform.

Five Mexican players have tested positive for banned substances in the lead up to the Gold Cup. The penalty? personal suspensions. No punishment for the team even if it is likely that recent opponents faced Mexican teams with several players on drugs.

The argument of punishing the many for the actions of few has never been more vague.

How many players have to cheat for the team to gain an unfair advantage? one? there? all the eleven?

There is only logical answer. A team should be penalized with a technical loss even if one offender is found in it’s ranks. There are too very good reasons.

From the moral side, even if we assume that 10 innocents are unfairly punished for the action of one, this is better than eleven innocent opponents faced with  the unfair scenario of facing a drug cheat.

More important is the practical side. The team is in the best position to run internal drug test and to make sure it’s players are clean, and punished if it fails to do so. Institutional responsibility.

Institutional responsibility? FIFA? We having a laugh!

 

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